WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, May 23

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Still crazy about metal after all these years.
Seth Gould
Still crazy about metal after all these years.

(May 23-June 24) METALmorphology
Metalwork has been around for millennia, but a few local folks are helping keep the form fresh. Edward Bigelow Baker III is one of them. METALmorphology is a collection of his sculptures on display at the Washington Project for the Arts in Northwest through Friday. The part-time physicist, part-time artist makes the most of his two passions by harnessing processes usually used in industrial and scientific settings to manipulate metal. If you’ve always wanted to know more about electrodeposition, this is a great opportunity.

Eighteen artists from across the country show off their metal work at the Torpedo Factory Art Center in Alexandria through late June. Forged showcases a number of contemporary approaches to one of the oldest known metalworking methods with pieces both practical and outrageous.

(May 23-June 16) Total Sham
If you like your art material a little more malleable, you probably couldn’t do much better than sawdust. Local sculptor Foon Sham explores themes of diligence and survival with towering cones made out of wood particles at Northwest’s Project 4 through mid-June.

Music: “Star Guitar” by Chemical Brothers

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