Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, May 9 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, May 9

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You can hear The Voice of Now now.
Arena Stage
You can hear The Voice of Now now.

(May 9-12) The talent of tomorrow, today
Every year Washington’s Arena Stage invites middle and high schoolers to spend six months learning about theater production with some of the institution’s masters. The result of the Voices of Now program is a four-day festival of performances. Eleven youth ensembles own the stage today through Saturday.

(May 9-31) Autistic alchemy
Fourteen-year-old Nat Jones has been painting and drawing elegant abstract works for eight years with watercolors, markers, crayons, and pastels. The talented teen’s colorful works are showing at Sub Urban Trading Co. in Kensington through the end of the month.

(May 12-13) Bethesda’s best
More than 100 contemporary artists and musicians get together for the Bethesda Fine Arts Festival this weekend. You’ll find painting, drawing, photography, furniture, jewelry and much more in Woodmont Triangle.

Music: “Song for Junior” by Beastie Boys

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