WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, April 25

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The mind behind Persepolis speaks at Washington's Lisner Auditorium Friday.
Sony Pictures Classics
The mind behind Persepolis speaks at Washington's Lisner Auditorium Friday.

(April 27) Marjane Satrapi
Iranian author, animator, and graphic novelist Marjane Satrapi stops by George Washington University’s Lisner Auditorium this week to discuss her work. The author of Persepolis and Chicken With Plums speaks to fellow Iranian writer Azar Nafisi about growing up amidst revolution and repression Friday night at 8.

(April 28-29) Middle East Moves
The District’s own Sahara Dance brings Middle Eastern moves to American University’s Greenberg Theatre this weekend. The 10th annual Under a Desert Moon Gala features more than 150 belly dancers showcasing Egyptian, tribal, folkloric, and fusion styles.

(April 29) All-American
For some art from these United States you can head to Arlington’s IOTA Club & Cafe this Sunday for a performance from Arlington’s own IBIS Chamber Music Society. The group made up of musicians from the Kennedy Center Orchestra and the Boston Pops, performs All-American, a program featuring music by Gershwin, Ellington, Dvorak and a few surprises.

Music: “Prelude to a Kiss” by World Saxophone Quartet

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Barbershop: UofL Basketball Ban, Football Concussions And The NFL Women's Summit

ESPN contributor Kevin Blackistone, Bloomberg View's Kavitha Davidson and The Washington Post's Wesley Lowery talk about the UofL basketball team, public opinion of the NFL, and women in sports.
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After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

Despite America's high coffee consumption, Keurig reported disappointing sales this week. Even during its popular holiday selling period, the numbers haven't perked up in recent years.
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On The Clock: Rubio Gets The Most Talking Time In Tonight's Debate

It was the last debate before the New Hampshire primary and Donald Trump was back onstage. Which GOP candidate ended up with the most talking time?
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How Limited Internet Access Can Subtract From Kids' Education

Smartphones are often credited with helping bridge the "digital divide" between people who do and don't have Internet access at home. But is mobile Internet enough for a family with a kid in school?

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