WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram, April 4

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This show is a total nightmare.
Mead Theatre Lab
This show is a total nightmare.

(April 5-7) The Nightmare Dreamer
If you want to feel better about your line of work, The Nightmare Dreamer will probably do the trick. The newly-minted, District-based Tattooed Potato theater company presents the production about a character who dreams other people’s nightmares for them. The play plumbs what it is to give away our darkest visions Thursday through Saturday at the Mead Theatre Lab in Northwest.

(April 4-June 9) The Future Is Now
For some retro visions of the future, Artisphere in Arlington opens Elevator to the Moon today. Fifteen contemporary artists draw inspiration from beautifully flawed 20th-century predictions for the future of space travel, from vacations on the moon to meals in a pill.

You can laugh at a two-hour dated vision of the future at AFI Silver in Silver Spring tonight and tomorrow. The 1976 cult classic Logan’s Run finds most of the residents of a 23rd-century city devoting themselves to the pursuit of pleasure before mandated termination at the age of 30. Two of them try to escape their fate and find answers beyond the city’s walls.

Music: “Yay” by Zammuto

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