WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram, Mar. 21

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Life in the District is exposed by DCist.
Christina Dela Rosa
Life in the District is exposed by DCist.

(March 21-April 1) DCist Exposed
Washington’s DCist blog posts exceptional images of life in the District on a daily basis. Forty choice images of recent vintage are featured in DCist Exposed, opening today at Long View Gallery in Northwest. The sixth annual exhibit showcases the work of local photographers through the first of April.

(March 21-April 2) Please touch
Local artists focus on having a little fun with their work in Play, showing through the end of the month at the The Art League in Alexandria. The Art League asked artists to create interactive works and they delivered. “Touch Me” signs can be found on paintings and sculptures that beckon to be rearranged or have darts thrown at them.

(March 21) Home is where the art is
Home is where the art is thanks to the Internet and the National Gallery of Art. If you seldom have time to visit the world-class institution, it’s bringing the art to you with NGA Images. The online collection allows you to browse, download, and share some 20,000 high-resolution, public domain images from the comfort of just about anywhere.

Music: “Porcelain” by Moby

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