'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram, Mar. 2 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram, Mar. 2

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Art depicting the hardships of Afghan life during war comes to the District this week.
Lillian Moats
Art depicting the hardships of Afghan life during war comes to the District this week.

(March 2-22) Windows and Mirrors to the world
Over forty muralists from across the United States contributed works to Windows and Mirrors: Reflections on the War in Afghanistan. The collection explores the human cost of one of our country’s longest-lasting battles and includes images drawn by Afghan students depicting their surroundings. Nine-hundred square feet of reflection on Afghan life during war are showing at the Methodist Building in Northeast Washington through March 22.

(March 3) It’s the circus of life
Some local performers try to transform young lives in the District with aerial antics Saturday at the Atlas Performing Arts Center in Northeast. High-flying aerialists meet modern dancers to benefit Zip Zap Circus, an organization that provides after-school circus fun for D.C.-youth.

(March 2) Stravinsky’s Spring
For some dance that’s a little more grounded The Kennedy Center has a mixture of movement courtesy of the District’s Bowen McCauley Dance tonight. The program caps off with a premiere performance of Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring in honor of the ballet’s hundredth birthday.

Music: “The Major Lift” by Years

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