WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram, Feb. 21

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You Are What You Eat at Strathmore explores our relationship with food with a giant toppled-over sculpture of an ice cream sundae.
Peter Anton
You Are What You Eat at Strathmore explores our relationship with food with a giant toppled-over sculpture of an ice cream sundae.

(Feb. 21) Thankful for the lack of a Thin Thursday?
Looking for an excuse to indulge? Well, it’s Fat Tuesday and the celebrations span the Washington-area. Arlington’s Bayou Bakery throws a party tonight with food, drink and live music. Northwest Washington’s Rumors has a similar bash with more beads and masks and New Orleans blues courtesy of the District’s own Lethal Peanut. And Clarendon gets into the spirit of the Big Easy with its annual Mardi Gras Parade. A few good floats, circus acts, and roller girls make their way down Wilson Boulevard tonight at 8.

(Feb. 21-March 17) Food Fight
If you can’t get enough grub tonight Strathmore in North Bethesda has You Are What You Eat until St. Patrick’s Day. Nine artists explore how food influences body image, our consumption culture, and our emotions with a variety of media. Expect a gigantic toppled-over sundae, a trash sculpture that moves when you do, and discarded food packaging that’s been woven into women’s clothing.

Music: “September/The Joker (Shinichi Osawa Remix)” by Earth, Wind & Fire / Fatboy Slim

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