'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram, Jan. 24 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram, Jan. 24

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Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada, 2009,  © Annie Leibovitz
American Art Museum
Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada, 2009, © Annie Leibovitz

(Jan. 24-Feb. 12) Necessary Sacrifices
Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass greatly influenced this nation’s stance on slavery in the 19th century. The two gifted orators had quite an influence on each other, too. The documented meetings between Lincoln and Douglass during a time of national crisis are explored in Necessary Sacrifices at Ford’s Theatre through mid-February. The production is presented in connection with the upcoming opening of Ford’s Center for Education and Leadership, which will further explore Lincoln’s legacy with exhibits, workshops and seminars.

(Jan. 24-May 20) Annie Leibovitz in the District
Annie Leibovitz is a living legend. The Library of Congress says so. The photographer speaks about her celebrated work in fashion, advertising and portraiture tonight at the American Art Museum. Pilgrimage, her latest collection of mostly landscape photography, is showing at the Museum through May.

Music: “Hold On” by Bill Frisell

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