WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram, Jan. 11

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Liana Finck's illustrations are showing at Washington's Sixth & I.
Liana Finck
Liana Finck's illustrations are showing at Washington's Sixth & I.

(Jan. 11) The Bintel Brief
You may know Washington’s Sixth & I as a great place to catch a band, hear a lecture or get in touch with your faith, but the synagogue also showcases some art now and again. Opening today is Liana Finck’s The Bintel Brief, a collection of illustrations that appeared alongside an advice column for young immigrants in the New York-based periodical The Jewish Daily Forward. Many of the testimonials in the paper end up being heartbreaking and absurd and the artwork is a perfect match - conveying plenty of emotion in a single square.

(Jan 12-Feb. 4) Finding the fun in the tragedy
For a funny take on another heartbreaking story Washington’s Faction of Fools Theatre Company has a fresh production of Romeo and Juliet opening tomorrow at the Mead Theatre Lab at Flashpoint in Northwest Washington. The Bard’s calling card tragedy is presented in Italian commedia dell’arte style with masks, improvisation and slapstick.

Music: “Mongst I & I (I Grade Dub Mix)” by Midnite


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