WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram, Nov. 29

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Oprah's favorite Thicke comes to the 9:30 Club Wednesday
Flickr user Redfishingboat.com: http://www.flickr.com/photos/emayoh/369484913/sizes/z/in/photostream/
Oprah's favorite Thicke comes to the 9:30 Club Wednesday

(Nov. 29-Dec. 4) Not your typical Krapp
The Shakespeare Theatre Company opens Krapp’s Last Tape today. Acclaimed English actor John Hurt stars in Samuel Beckett’s one-act play about a 69-year-old man who is profoundly affected after watching some film footage of his 39-year-old self.

(Nov. 29-Jan. 14) Tadeusz Lapinski’s Past and Present
Brentwood Arts Exchange looks back at the work and influence of lithographer and educator Tadeusz Lapinksi in Past and Present, showing through mid-January. The recently retired Professor of Art at the University of Maryland specializes in vibrant abstract prints.
 
(Nov. 29) Thicke Skin
You’ve probably never longed to hear Growing Pains star Alan Thicke’s singing voice, but his son Robin has a pretty respectable set of pipes. The soulful R&B singer and songwriter has penned hits for Lil’ Wayne, Usher and Mary J. Blige and counts Oprah as one of his fans. He brings his own jams to Washington’s 9:30 Club tomorrow night.

Music: “Wanna Love U Girl” by Robin Thick

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