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'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram, Nov. 16

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Sol LeWitt's 'Wavy Brushstrokes Superimposed' is among the prints showing in Multiplicity at the American Art Museum.
American Art Museum
Sol LeWitt's 'Wavy Brushstrokes Superimposed' is among the prints showing in Multiplicity at the American Art Museum.

(Nov. 16-March 11) Just as good without Michael Keaton
The American Art Museum takes the “more is more” approach in Multiplicity. The exhibition features large-scale prints and focuses on how the best contemporary printmakers inject a certain uniqueness into their work through repetition and pairing of images.

(Nov. 16) The Sri-Lankan-Canadian author
Sri-Lankan born Canadian author Michael Ondaatje drops by Washington’s Sixth & I Historic Synagogue tonight. The Booker Prize-winning author of The English Patient reads from his latest novel, The Cat’s Table which follows an eleven-year-old boy on a sea voyage filled with adventure, jazz, and childhood discovery.

(Nov. 17) You’re legendary, Buster
Northeast Washington’s African Continuum Theatre Company opens The Legend of Buster Neal tomorrow. A fearless civil rights activist finds the challenge of a lifetime in the form of his great-great grandson. The two work through family issues, blame games and the use of “the N-word”.

Music:  “Sleepwalkin’” by Modest Mouse

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