WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

'Art Beat' With Sean Rameswaram, Sept. 19

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Common Place examines the relationship between housekeepers and housewives in Chile.
The Society Pages
Common Place examines the relationship between housekeepers and housewives in Chile.

 

(Sept. 15-Jan. 22) La Ayuda

If you read The Help or saw The Help and could go for some art with similar themes to The Help the Art Museum of the Americas in Northwest Washington has Common Place through late January 2012. Photos, videos and surveys of 100 Chilean women portray the evolving subordinate relationship between Latin American housekeepers and their housewife employers, reflecting issues of gender, power, class and race. A second exhibit by Chilean artists at the museum examines the intersection of art and politics. 

(Sept. 19-March) A Nation Divided

For more politics there's an exhibit of artifacts, photographs and lithographs opening today at the US Capitol. "A Nation Divided" marks the 150th anniversary of the Civil War with historically significant items that relate to the role of Congress and the Capitol during the pivotal point in our nation's history.

Music: "Help Somebody" by Maxwell

 

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