All Things Considered | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

All Things Considered

Schedule
88.5-1
Monday - Friday
4:00 pm
Monday - Friday
6:30 pm
Saturday & Sunday
5:00 pm
88.3
Monday - Friday
4:00 pm
Monday - Friday
6:30 pm
Saturday & Sunday
5:00 pm

Commonly referred to as "ATC" and a staple for afternoon commutes, NPR's nationally syndicated afternoon news magazine brings you closer to home with the presence of WAMU's local host.

Since May 3, 1971 All Things Considered has been produced every day from NPR's headquarters in Washington, D.C. Featuring a mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews, and offbeat features, "ATC" produces 2 hours of fresh content every day for hundreds of public radio stations around the United States.

Pat Brogan

Pat Brogan

Local Host, All Things Considered

Pat Brogan joined the WAMU 88.5 news team in 2007 after four years as a managing editor at WMAL-AM,and a brief stint at WTOP-FM, both in Washington, D.C. Prior to that, Brogan served nine years as a news anchor and reporter at WLW-AM in Cincinnati, Ohio. He has received multiple AP awards, and has covered local sports, including the Redskins, Nationals, and Wizards.


NPR

Poet Tishani Doshi Reads Her Summer Poem

In her poem, "Visiting My Parents in Summer," Tishani Doshi writes about returning to her childhood bedroom, where she experiences it being preserved just as she left it as a teenager.
NPR

Canadians Fret Merger With Burger Will Change Tim Hortons

Burger King announced it is buying the Canadian doughnut-and-coffee chain for about $11 million. Some Canadian's aren't thrilled that their Timmy's is being taken over by the American burger company.
NPR

After Inspector General Report, Veterans Want More Than Promises

The report said it couldn't be proven that anyone had died because of wait times at the medical center in Phoenix. On Tuesday, President Obama pledged to do better by vets and announced initiatives.
NPR

Pew Study: Facebook, Twitter Users Held Back Views On Snowden

The Pew Research Center report shows that Americans were more willing to have a conversation about NSA leaker Edward Snowden face-to-face than in discussion groups on Facebook or Twitter.