All Things Considered | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

All Things Considered

Schedule
88.5-1
Monday - Friday
4:00 pm
Monday - Friday
6:30 pm
Saturday & Sunday
5:00 pm
88.3
Monday - Friday
4:00 pm
Monday - Friday
6:30 pm
Saturday & Sunday
5:00 pm

Commonly referred to as "ATC" and a staple for afternoon commutes, NPR's nationally syndicated afternoon news magazine brings you closer to home with the presence of WAMU's local host.

Since May 3, 1971 All Things Considered has been produced every day from NPR's headquarters in Washington, D.C. Featuring a mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews, and offbeat features, "ATC" produces 2 hours of fresh content every day for hundreds of public radio stations around the United States.

Pat Brogan

Pat Brogan

Local Host, All Things Considered

Pat Brogan joined the WAMU 88.5 news team in 2007 after four years as a managing editor at WMAL-AM,and a brief stint at WTOP-FM, both in Washington, D.C. Prior to that, Brogan served nine years as a news anchor and reporter at WLW-AM in Cincinnati, Ohio. He has received multiple AP awards, and has covered local sports, including the Redskins, Nationals, and Wizards.


WAMU 88.5

Director Says He Was Fired From Theater J, Cites 'Philosophical Differences'

After 18 years as artistic director of the Washington DCJCC's in-house theater company, Ari Roth is leaving. In a statement, the JCC says Roth "is stepping down to pursue a new series of endeavors." But Roth says he was fired.
NPR

New Cuba Relationship Could Be A Boon For American Farmers

Two-thirds of the food Cubans eat is imported — but the reestablishment of ties with the U.S. could open opportunities for American farmers.
WAMU 88.5

Report Prompts Legislators To Call For More Investment In Secret Service

Lawmakers in the D.C. region are calling for more money for the Secret Service after a review released this week paints the picture of an agency stretched "beyond its limits."
NPR

Obama Says 'James Flacco.' The Internet Says, Thank You

It was an honest mistake. But when President Obama said "James Flacco" when referring to James Franco — on a Friday before the holidays, no less — the slip was eagerly received online.