All Things Considered

Schedule
88.5-1
Monday - Friday
4:00 pm
Monday - Friday
6:30 pm
Saturday & Sunday
5:00 pm

Commonly referred to as "ATC" and a staple for afternoon commutes, NPR's nationally syndicated afternoon news magazine brings you closer to home with the presence of WAMU's local host.

Since May 3, 1971 All Things Considered has been produced every day from NPR's headquarters in Washington, D.C. Featuring a mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews, and offbeat features, "ATC" produces 2 hours of fresh content every day for hundreds of public radio stations around the United States.

Jonathan Wilson

Local Host, All Things Considered

Wilson spent five years working as a local television reporter at stations in Indiana and Arkansas. After growing tired of local TV news, he arrived in the WAMU Newsroom in 2008 as volunteer and quickly realized that working as a public radio reporter was his dream job. Luckily, the bosses at WAMU decided not to crush his dreams and gave him a chance. Now he won’t leave.

Wilson is a graduate of Middlebury College, and received his Masters’ from the Medill School of Journalism. He is a native of Arlington, Virginia, and lives there now with his wife and his daughter.


NPR

Award-Winning Campaign To Eliminate Prostitution Takes A Dark Approach

NPR's Ari Shapiro interviews Riccardo Fregoso, executive creative director of McCann Paris, about their Clio Award-winning ad called "The Girls of Paradise," which draws potential johns in for a rude surprise.
NPR

Whales, Sea Turtles, Seals: The Unintended Catch Of Abandoned Fishing Gear

An endangered whale was found dead over the weekend, entangled in derelict fishing gear. Such incidents have been on the rise in recent years. A new California law aims to combat the problem.
NPR

No, Donald Trump Didn't Win Post-Debate 'Polls'

The internet surveys the GOP nominee frequently cites are unscientific and can be easily manipulated. Reputable scientific polls taken after the debate show Hillary Clinton was the clear winner.
NPR

I Guess We Need To Talk About Pepe The Frog

A cartoon frog became popular, then a pariah. Now the Anti-Defamation League has identified it as a hate symbol. We take a short look at the amphibious, ambiguous meme.