All Things Considered | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

All Things Considered

Schedule
88.5-1
Monday - Friday
4:00 pm
Monday - Friday
6:30 pm
Saturday & Sunday
5:00 pm
88.3
Monday - Friday
4:00 pm
Monday - Friday
6:30 pm
Saturday & Sunday
5:00 pm

Commonly referred to as "ATC" and a staple for afternoon commutes, NPR's nationally syndicated afternoon news magazine brings you closer to home with the presence of WAMU's local host.

Since May 3, 1971 All Things Considered has been produced every day from NPR's headquarters in Washington, D.C. Featuring a mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews, and offbeat features, "ATC" produces 2 hours of fresh content every day for hundreds of public radio stations around the United States.

Pat Brogan

Pat Brogan

Local Host, All Things Considered

Pat Brogan joined the WAMU 88.5 news team in 2007 after four years as a managing editor at WMAL-AM,and a brief stint at WTOP-FM, both in Washington, D.C. Prior to that, Brogan served nine years as a news anchor and reporter at WLW-AM in Cincinnati, Ohio. He has received multiple AP awards, and has covered local sports, including the Redskins, Nationals, and Wizards.


NPR

Snubs And Successes: 6 Lessons Learned From This Year's Emmy Nominations

HBO's Game of Thrones emerged as the most-nominated series with 19 nods for the Primetime Emmy Awards, but new series such as FX's Fargo and HBO's True Detective scored, too.
NPR

'Captain Pizza' Saves The Day, But Doesn't Save Himself A Slice

A pilot found himself hungry during a midflight delay. But instead of just buying a pizza for himself, he bought 50 pizzas for the entire Frontier Airlines plane.
NPR

Study: Statehouse Press Corps In Decline

A Pew report found the number of full-time newspaper reporters covering state politics fell dramatically in the last decade, raising questions about their ability to closely monitor politicians.
NPR

A New Device Lets You Track Your Preschooler ... And Listen In

LG's KizON wristband lets you keep tabs on your child. But some experts say such devices send the wrong message about the world we live in. And the gadgets raise questions about kids' privacy rights.