All Things Considered

Schedule
88.5-1
Monday - Friday
4:00 pm
Monday - Friday
6:30 pm
Saturday & Sunday
5:00 pm

Commonly referred to as "ATC" and a staple for afternoon commutes, NPR's nationally syndicated afternoon news magazine brings you closer to home with the presence of WAMU's local host.

Since May 3, 1971 All Things Considered has been produced every day from NPR's headquarters in Washington, D.C. Featuring a mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews, and offbeat features, "ATC" produces 2 hours of fresh content every day for hundreds of public radio stations around the United States.

Jonathan Wilson

Local Host, All Things Considered

Wilson spent five years working as a local television reporter at stations in Indiana and Arkansas. After growing tired of local TV news, he arrived in the WAMU Newsroom in 2008 as volunteer and quickly realized that working as a public radio reporter was his dream job. Luckily, the bosses at WAMU decided not to crush his dreams and gave him a chance. Now he won’t leave.

Wilson is a graduate of Middlebury College, and received his Masters’ from the Medill School of Journalism. He is a native of Arlington, Virginia, and lives there now with his wife and his daughter.


WAMU 88.5

Verdine White On 45 Years With Earth, Wind & Fire

Forty-five years ago, the band “Earth, Wind and Fire” introduced audiences to a new kind of funk--one that fused soul, jazz, Latin and pop. Bassist Verdine White talks to guest host Derek McGinty about breaking racial boundaries in music and how the band is still evolving.

NPR

If War Is Hell, Then Coffee Has Offered U.S. Soldiers Some Salvation

"Nobody can soldier without coffee," a Union cavalryman wrote in 1865. Hidden Kitchens looks at three American wars through the lens of coffee: the Civil War, Vietnam and Afghanistan.
WAMU 88.5

What's Ahead At The Democratic National Convention

The Democratic National Convention gets underway in Philadelphia, where Hillary Clinton will accept the presidential nomination.

NPR

Pokémon Go Is Everywhere, Even At Foggy Bottom

State Department briefings can be long, so it wasn't surprising that a reporter seemed a little distracted the other day. Department spokesman John Kirby caught the reporter playing Pokémon Go.