All Things Considered

Monday - Friday
4:00 pm
Monday - Friday
6:30 pm
Saturday & Sunday
5:00 pm

Commonly referred to as "ATC" and a staple for afternoon commutes, NPR's nationally syndicated afternoon news magazine brings you closer to home with the presence of WAMU's local host.

Since May 3, 1971 All Things Considered has been produced every day from NPR's headquarters in Washington, D.C. Featuring a mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews, and offbeat features, "ATC" produces 2 hours of fresh content every day for hundreds of public radio stations around the United States.

Jonathan Wilson

Local Host, All Things Considered

Wilson spent five years working as a local television reporter at stations in Indiana and Arkansas. After growing tired of local TV news, he arrived in the WAMU Newsroom in 2008 as volunteer and quickly realized that working as a public radio reporter was his dream job. Luckily, the bosses at WAMU decided not to crush his dreams and gave him a chance. Now he won’t leave.

Wilson is a graduate of Middlebury College, and received his Masters’ from the Medill School of Journalism. He is a native of Arlington, Virginia, and lives there now with his wife and his daughter.


New York's Museum Of Modern Art Acquires Original Emoji

NPR's Robert Siegel speaks with Paola Antonelli, senior curator at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, about the museum's recent acquisition of the original emoji for its permanent collection.

Technology May Rescue Male Baby Chicks From The Grinder

The egg industry may soon eliminate a wasteful — and to some, horrifying — practice: slaughtering male chicks. New technology can identify male embryos in eggs before they enter incubation chambers.

Hillary Clinton Calls On FBI To Release Information On Newly Discovered Emails

Clinton called on the FBI to release information about the newly discovered emails that appear to be related to a review of classified information on the server she used as secretary of state.

A Moment Of Silence For The Black And Brown Talent That Grew On Vine

We'll miss Vine, but not just for its goofy, raw, six-second looped videos. We'll miss the platform for its ability to incubate young black talent.