All Things Considered | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

All Things Considered

Schedule
88.5-1
Monday - Friday
4:00 pm
Monday - Friday
6:30 pm
Saturday & Sunday
5:00 pm
88.3
Monday - Friday
4:00 pm
Monday - Friday
6:30 pm
Saturday & Sunday
5:00 pm

Commonly referred to as "ATC" and a staple for afternoon commutes, NPR's nationally syndicated afternoon news magazine brings you closer to home with the presence of WAMU's local host.

Since May 3, 1971 All Things Considered has been produced every day from NPR's headquarters in Washington, D.C. Featuring a mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews, and offbeat features, "ATC" produces 2 hours of fresh content every day for hundreds of public radio stations around the United States.

Pat Brogan

Pat Brogan

Local Host, All Things Considered

Pat Brogan joined the WAMU 88.5 news team in 2007 after four years as a managing editor at WMAL-AM,and a brief stint at WTOP-FM, both in Washington, D.C. Prior to that, Brogan served nine years as a news anchor and reporter at WLW-AM in Cincinnati, Ohio. He has received multiple AP awards, and has covered local sports, including the Redskins, Nationals, and Wizards.


NPR

Hollywood's Acceptance Of White Privilege Revealed By Sony Hack

While some leaked Sony emails seemed racist, NPR TV critic Eric Deggans says they hint at a wider issue: an acceptance of practices, habits and perceptions that limit diversity in Hollywood.
NPR

Nutmeg Spice Has A Secret Story That Isn't So Nice

Nutmeg is a feel-good holiday spice. But it once caused serious bloodshed and may have even been a reason the Dutch were willing to part with Manhattan in the 1600s.
NPR

Hollywood's Acceptance Of White Privilege Revealed By Sony Hack

While some leaked Sony emails seemed racist, NPR TV critic Eric Deggans says they hint at a wider issue: an acceptance of practices, habits and perceptions that limit diversity in Hollywood.
NPR

Hollywood's Acceptance Of White Privilege Revealed By Sony Hack

While some leaked Sony emails seemed racist, NPR TV critic Eric Deggans says they hint at a wider issue: an acceptance of practices, habits and perceptions that limit diversity in Hollywood.