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Morsi's Ousting Prompts Strong Reactions Around Middle East

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The immediate reaction to the military overthrow of Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi reveals how political and religious fault lines have shifted in the region. Saudi Arabia, an Islamist theocracy, quickly praised the ouster of the Muslim Brotherhood, a group Riyadh sees as a rival. Also cheering was Syria's Bashar al-Assad, whom the Saudis are trying to help force from power. Assad declared that the Egyptian coup marks "the fall of political Islam." Turkey, ruled by a party with roots in political Islam, voiced dismay at the developments, which echo the military coups that plagued Turkey from 1960 through the end of the 20th century. As in Egypt, the Turkish military was deeply entrenched in economic and political life, and analysts suggest that if history is any guide, Egyptians now face a long uncertain road ahead.
NPR

Comic-Con Has Become Poké-Con

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NPR

Scraped, Splattered — But Silent No More. Finally, The Dinner Plate Gets Its Say

Instagram is the Internet's semi-obsessive, borderline-creepy love letter to food. But behind every great meal is a plate doing a pretty-OK job. So a comedian made an Instagram to celebrate plates.
NPR

In Kaine, Clinton Gains A Swing-State Spanish Speaker

Who is Tim Kaine, and what does he bring to the Democratic presidential ticket? NPR's Mara Liasson provides answers.
NPR

Making The Cloud Green: Tech Firms Push For Renewable Energy Sources

Few people can demand what kind of electricity they get. But Microsoft and Facebook, which operate huge, power-hungry data centers, are trying to green up the electricity grid with their buying power.

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