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The Movie Saoirse Ronan Has 'Seen A Million Times'

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The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

The movie that actor Saoirse Ronan, whose credits include the films Atonement, The Lovely Bones, Hanna and The Host — currently in theaters — could watch a million times is the Jane Austen-inspired comedy Clueless.


Interview Highlights

On when she first saw the movie

"I saw Clueless probably when I was about 8 or 9 years old. And, I had certain films that I would fall asleep so it was Clueless for quite a long time, and I used to just watch it every single night and knew every single line, every single quote."

On why she loves the performances in Clueless

"The performance by Alicia Silverstone is so kind of, it's so genuine, it seems like, you know, um, it's like people that you see in the valley, you know? The performances were so kind of fresh and the timing and everything was so great from each person that I think that will last a very long time."

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