The Movie Emily Spivey Has 'Seen A Million Times' | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
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The Movie Emily Spivey Has 'Seen A Million Times'

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The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

The movie that comedy writer Emily Spivey, whose credits include the television shows Saturday Night Live, Parks and Recreation and Up All Night — which she wrote and created — could watch a million times is the comedy 9 to 5.


Interview Highlights

On the first time she saw 9 to 5

"I saw it in the theater in 1980, and I'll never forget how packed the theater was and how hard people were laughing. Like, you hear the term, 'rolling in the aisles,' people were literally rolling in the aisles. And at the time I kind of got it but not really, I was like 8, and then as I got older I really got hooked on it. I've been watching this movie my whole life, over and over and over."

On what she loves about the movie

"I love the performances. I adore Dolly Parton. I think she's an amazing comedy actress, I think she's super underrated and she's just a real charmer in this movie."

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