Filed Under:

The Movie Connie Britton Has 'Seen A Million Times'

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

The movie that actress Connie Britton, whose credits include the television shows "Friday Night Lights," "American Horror Story," and "Nashville" — currently on the ABC network— could watch a million times is Colin Higgins' Foul Play.


Interview Highlights

On why she loves Foul Play

"I kind of grew up watching these great romantic comedies that I feel, we don't make them the way we used to. So I just loved that funny, romantic relationship and I loved Goldie Hawn — huge fan of Goldie Hawn — and that Goldie Hawn/Chevy Chase dynamic, I could watch it over and over again, and I did."

On what she learned from the movie

"From watching a movie like Foul Play, I've always said that I want to play a full-fledged charaacter that has drama and a sense of humor. And I think that was because I was so heavily influenced by funny ladies such as Goldie Hawn."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

WAMU 88.5

Remains In Jamestown Linked To Early Colonial Leaders

Scientists from the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and The Jamestown Rediscovery Foundation say they've identified four men buried in the earliest English church in America.
WAMU 88.5

The Democracy Of The Diner

Whether the decor is faux '50s silver and neon or authentic greasy spoon, diners are classic Americana, down to the familiar menu items. Rich, poor, black, white--all rub shoulders in the vinyl booths and at formica counters. We explore the enduring appeal and nostalgia of the diner.

WAMU 88.5

D.C. Council Member David Grosso

D.C. Council Member and Chair of the Committee on Education David Grosso joins us to discuss local public policy issues, including the challenges facing D.C. Public Schools.

NPR

Researchers Warn Against 'Autonomous Weapons' Arms Race

Already, researcher Stuart Russell says, sentry robots in South Korea "can spot and track a human being for a distance of 2 miles — and can very accurately kill that person."

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.