The Movie Connie Britton Has 'Seen A Million Times' | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
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The Movie Connie Britton Has 'Seen A Million Times'

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

The movie that actress Connie Britton, whose credits include the television shows "Friday Night Lights," "American Horror Story," and "Nashville" — currently on the ABC network— could watch a million times is Colin Higgins' Foul Play.


Interview Highlights

On why she loves Foul Play

"I kind of grew up watching these great romantic comedies that I feel, we don't make them the way we used to. So I just loved that funny, romantic relationship and I loved Goldie Hawn — huge fan of Goldie Hawn — and that Goldie Hawn/Chevy Chase dynamic, I could watch it over and over again, and I did."

On what she learned from the movie

"From watching a movie like Foul Play, I've always said that I want to play a full-fledged charaacter that has drama and a sense of humor. And I think that was because I was so heavily influenced by funny ladies such as Goldie Hawn."

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