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The Movie Roman Coppola Has 'Seen A Million Times'

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The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

The movie that writer-director Roman Coppola, whose credits include CQ, Moonrise Kingdom and A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III — currently playing in theaters — could watch a million times is Woody Allen's Stardust Memories.


Interview Highlights

On why he finds Stardust Memories so funny

"The film is filled with references and inside jokes that pertain to [Woody Allen's] body of work and other films that he admires, and it's all played for laughs but the humor is rather tied to the vest so the things that I find to be very hilarious are hilarious in a very subtle way."

On why he watches the film over and over again

"It's a film that I routinely watch, you know, if I'm not sure what I want to see, and then you end up getting sucked into it. So, there are certain movies that for some reason have that quality. I think Dr. Strangelove is another one; All That Jazz, for me, Annie Hall -- there are a handful of movies — and for some reason they are so rich that to watch it again and to pick it up in the middle or to just watch a scene or you know, to have a little contact with it is just so welcome. So it's a mystery."

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