Colleges Try To Curtail Flu Risk For Students | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
Filed Under:

Colleges Try To Curtail Flu Risk For Students

Play associated audio

As college students return to class from winter break this week, campuses around the nation are bracing for the possibility of a flu outbreak.

Colleges in Boston are especially worried after the mayor's declaration last week of a public health emergency in the city. The city's student population is large — around 150,000. And though 20-year-olds might not seem like as vulnerable as the elderly or babies, dorm life doesn't make it easy to avoid a highly transmissible disease.

College health officials say it can be a perfect storm for a flu outbreak, when you also consider that young people are among the least likely to worry about getting the flu, or getting the vaccine.

Dr. Tom Nary of Boston College says colleges learned a lot from the H1N1 outbreak a few years ago about what to do — things like moving sick students out of dorms and urging everyone to get the vaccine. This year, officials implored students not to leave home at the end of winter break without it.

For more on how institutions of higher learning and students in Boston are trying to keep the flu at bay, listen to the audio from today's All Things Considered.

Copyright 2013 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

How To Sell Diverse Books: A Bookstore Owner's Advice

It's not news that the publishing world isn't very diverse. But over on the other side of the industry, how do owners of neighborhood bookstores try to sell books for or about people of color?
NPR

Can Quinoa Take Root On The 'Roof Of The World'?

Quinoa, once a homebody crop, crossed the Atlantic for the first time this century. Now the Food and Agriculture Organization has a hunch it can thrive in Central and Southwest Asia.
NPR

Senate Control May Swing On North Carolina's Unpopularity Contest

Democratic incumbent Kay Hagan wants voters to punish her GOP challenger Thom Tillis, the speaker of the state House, for unpopular laws. Tillis wants to aim anger toward the president at Hagan.
NPR

Islamic State Uses Online Strategies To Get Its Message Out

Experts say the videotaped killing of journalist James Foley is part of a broader propaganda strategy by Islamist militants. The group, the Islamic State, has become a master of the video medium.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.