The Movie RZA Has 'Seen A Million Times' | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
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The Movie RZA Has 'Seen A Million Times'

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The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

For rapper Robert Fitzgerald Diggs, a founding member of the rap group the Wu-Tang Clan and better known by his stage name RZA, the movie he could watch a million times is Sergio Leone's The Good, the Bad and the Ugly. RZA makes his directorial debut with The Man With the Iron Fists, which opened in theaters this weekend.


Interview Highlights

On watching The Good, the Bad and the Ugly as a child

"Well, the first time I saw it, it was just the coolness of the gun-shooting and everything like that. But as I watched it again in my teenage years, I was just blown away by the way the scenes were set up, the way the characters were all just uniquely separate but had to come together, you know what I mean?"

On seeing the film as an adult

"When I watched it on DVD, this is when I really learned to appreciate the film because by now the TV screens got bigger and you could see the scope of the cinematography and of the wide shots and I was able to catch the barrenness of these cities or these villages. It's funny, this movie is to me an American classic, even though it's an Italian film."

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