Test Your Clever Side With 'Another Thing'

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Each week, All Things Considered and Lenore Skenazy, author of the book and blog Free Range Kids, bring you "Another Thing," an on-air puzzle to test your cleverness skills. We take a trend in the news and challenge you to help us satirize it with a song title, a movie name or something else wacky.

This week's challenge: A handful of private companies are taking reservations for space flights. That means that there may soon be a lot of tourists floating around — which, in turn, means a lot of mouths to feed.

What will be the name of the first chain restaurant in outer space?

Submit your entry using the form below or by sending your answer with your name, address and phone number to anotherthing@npr.org. If submitting via email, please type "Space Food" in the subject line.

Entries are due by 12 p.m. EDT on Sept. 12. All entries become property of NPR, which reserves the right to edit them. Entries submitted as comments on this Web page cannot be considered. In the case of several similar entries, the first one received gets credit.

The winner will be announced on All Things Considered on Sept. 17. The first-prize winner will receive an NPR mug.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.


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