An Olympic-Sized Outrage Grows Over French Fry Sales At The Games

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When McDonald's cut a deal to make itself the exclusive purveyor of french fries and the similar (but please don't say matching) chips at the 2012 Olympic Games in London later this month, it may not have anticipated the flurry of responses. Foodies raged, nutritionists nagged, and many called it another example of an American cultural takeover.

Later today, you can listen to London-based correspondent Philip Reeves for the latest on what some are calling sales of "non-freedom fries" at this summer's games on All Things Considered, including a snippet of the famed Greasy Chip Butty Song.

Meanwhile, here's a hearty helping of what we're reading now about Chipgate:


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