The Movie Elizabeth Banks Has 'Seen A Million Times' | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
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The Movie Elizabeth Banks Has 'Seen A Million Times'

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The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen a Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

For actress Elizabeth Banks, whose credits include The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Role Models, The Hunger Games and People Like Us — which opens in theaters this weekend — the movie she could watch a million times is Quentin Tarantino's Pulp Fiction. "Every character jumps off the screen," she says.


INTERVIEW HIGHLIGHTS

On what she loves about Pulp Fiction

"Quentin [Tarantino] has such a specific voice in the movie, and the language that he uses is incredible and completely melodic, and as an actor that's the kind of language that we all want to speak. I mean, it's almost Shakespearean."

On why the film left such an impression on her

"I really feel like, you know, it was like the mark of a brand-new filmmaker and someone that was going to be important and continues to be important. You know he, just, inspired me."

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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