Filed Under:

Professor: Civil War Death Toll May Be Really Off

Play associated audio
The accepted number for deaths in the American Civil War for more than a century has been 620,000 from both sides of the conflict. But now a history professor at the State University of New York in Binghamton believes that number is far too low and the real number is closer to 750,000. Robert Siegel talks with J. David Hacker about how he came to his new number.
NPR

Comparing Both Conventions As TV: Did Either One Get An Edge?

Now that the national conventions have concluded, NPR TV critic Eric Deggans looks back on both, judging them purely as television programs. Policy aside, did either convention make for compelling TV?
NPR

Salvage Supperclub: A High-End Dinner In A Dumpster To Fight Food Waste

The ingredients — think wilted basil, bruised plums, garbanzo bean water — sound less than appetizing. Whipped together, they're a tasty meal that show how home cooks can use often-tossed foods.
NPR

Kaine Highlights His Catholic Faith On The Trail — But Will It Sway Catholic Voters?

Democratic vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine has put his Jesuit upbringing front and center in the campaign, raising the question: What role will Catholic voters play in the upcoming election?
NPR

Despite Uber's Rise, New Study Says Drunk Driving Remains Steady

Ride-hailing companies like Uber have claimed that they've helped discourage drunk driving. Does the claim stand up? David Kirk, co-author of a new study in the American Journal of Epidemiology, tells NPR's Kelly McEvers he's not so sure.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.