The Movie Dustin Lance Black's 'Seen A Million Times'

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The Weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

For writer-director Dustin Lance Black, whose credits include Milk, J. Edgar, and his new film, Virginia (now out in theaters), the movie he can't get enough of is Rob Reiner's When Harry Met Sally.

Interview Highlights

On why he's seen the movie so often

"It doesn't matter how many times you watch it, it's always interesting and you're always identifying with a different scene in the movie. At least I am. And the hope is that you're always progressing to a later and later scene in the film so that one day, you may get to the end and you may be running through Manhattan on New Year's Eve to kiss the person you truly love, and you know you love them and they love you in return, and you're aiming for that."

On his favorite scene

"If this movie is on TV or on pay-per-view or on an airplane recently I saw it again, I always check in to see how I'm progressing and unfortunately, it seems that I'm always returning to the Carrie Fisher- Rolodex-scene in the movie where you're looking for somebody new."

On why he relates to "the Rolodex scene"

"Far too often I find myself in that position and you're just screaming inside saying, 'No, no, no, it's not about that, there's something more magical than a Rolodex in the park,' and you find yourself in tears. [The movie is] speaking to such basic truths about matchmaking and love that I think it's withstood the test of time."

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