Why Did The Rooster Cross The Road? To Get To A Chicken Restaurant

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Thank goodness he doesn't know what's going on inside.

Candice Ludlow of member station WKNO today helps All Things Considered ketchup ... er catch up ... on a story that's been cooking for a week or so in Tennessee.

It seems that a big red rooster has been hanging out in front of a restaurant in Collierville, Tenn., for the past few months.

But it's not just any restaurant.

It's called Gus's Fried Chicken, as Memphis' The Commercial Appeal reported earlier this month. And, yes, the rooster has to cross the road to get there.

Candice reports that restaurant owner Mathew McCrory says since the bird started showing up, business has picked up: "You know, we've got a little bit of publication out of him, a little press with him hanging out here. Customers always come in and try to take pictures of him. He's been good for business he's been good. We call him Gus."

WREG-TV from Memphis also checked out the story last week. It has video of Gus (a.k.a. Big Red).

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