Flight From Syria: A Photographer's Story

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While on assignment for Time magazine, war photographer William Daniels sneaked into Syria to cover the military siege of the Baba Amr neighborhood of Homs. He had only spent a few hours there — in "a makeshift press center," as Time describes — when a shelling attack killed American reporter Marie Colvin and French photographer Remi Ochlik on Feb. 22, and left several others injured.

The cover story in this week's issue of Time is devoted to Daniels' account of that attack — and what came after.

"His dramatic story is a microcosm of what millions of Syrians are going through, only they cannot escape the iron hand of their government and their suffering is far worse," writes Rick Stengel, the managing editor of Time writes in the magazine. Stengel continues:

We tell this story, to not only document the atrocities occurring in Syria but also highlight the fact that journalists like Daniels, Bouvier, Ochlik and Colvin have been the primary means by which the world even knows what is going on there.

In an interview with NPR's Melissa Block, Daniels says he would rather discuss what is happening in Syria than what happened to him and his colleagues. Click the audio to hear that interview.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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