Gay Marine's Kiss Was 'Four Years Of Pent-Up Emotion And Secret Love'

Play associated audio

When he returned from Afghanistan and saw his partner waiting to welcome him home, "four years of pent-up emotion and secret love" just seemed to naturally lead to "what felt like an eternity kiss," Marine Sgt. Brandon Morgan told NPR this afternoon.

In a conversation with All Things Considered producer Art Silverman, part of which will be broadcast on the show later today, Morgan discussed the kiss and the now viral photo that we blogged about Monday.

"I looked to my left" and saw Dalan Wells, his partner, Morgan said. "My legs started going numb ... and I didn't care who was around. ... I wanted to show him how much I cared for him." They've known each other for four years.

And the post-kiss reaction sparked by the photo's posting on the Web has made him "very hopeful," Morgan said, "because even though there's been a lot of negative responses, the positive responses have been overwhelming."

The "don't ask, don't tell" policy that had barred openly gay men and women from serving in the U.S. military ended last September.

Click here to find an NPR station that broadcasts or streams All Things Considered.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

'Easy' Writer: Walter Mosley's Passion For Bringing Black L.A. Stories To Life

In Charcoal Joe, Walter Mosley brings his iconic private eye Easy Rawlins into the haze of the late 60s, extending a literary odyssey through the transformation of black Los Angeles.
NPR

Salvage Supperclub: A High-End Dinner In A Dumpster To Fight Food Waste

The ingredients — think wilted basil, bruised plums, garbanzo bean water — sound less than appetizing. Whipped together, they're a tasty meal that show how home cooks can use often-tossed foods.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour – LIVE from Slim's Diner!

This special edition of the Politics Hour is coming to you live from Slim's Diner from Petworth in Northwest D.C.

NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.