Military Drops 'Birth Control Glasses' For Fresher Pair | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio
Filed Under:

Military Drops 'Birth Control Glasses' For Fresher Pair

Play associated audio

On a military procurement manifesto, they're S9s; but to a new soldier who's just received a new pair, they're BCGs, or Birth Control Glasses. The spectacles' thick frame and large lenses are said to make the wearer so unattractive that chances of connecting with a member of the opposite sex become vanishingly small.

Now, however, the military is offering a new design — a nod to the fact that the standard-issue specs are so ugly, many troops end up stuffing them in the back of their trunk as soon as they leave training.

Retired Navy optometrist Edward Grout tells NPR's Robert Siegel that BCGs deserve their unfortunate name.

"When I entered the Navy initially, we had some gray frames, and then we went to some black frames," Grout says. "When the brown frames came out, we were all a little disappointed."

That was back in 1990. Now, 22 years later, the military is switching to a smaller, sleeker, black-framed style.

"Time will probably tell whether or not the new 5A frame will be considered an improvement," Grout says. "I believe that it will because of the fact that nowadays, it seems to be a little more stylish for a lot of individuals to go back to that Buddy Holly appearance."

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Not My Job: Comedian Jenny Slate Gets Quizzed On Jennifer Lopez

Slate has rocketed to fame with her online film series Marcel the Shell with Shoes On and the movie Obvious Child — but there are some other famous Jennifers out there ...
NPR

Antarctic Holiday: A Christmas Feast In The Loneliest Spot On Earth

For Dr. Gavin Francis, Christmas Eve marked the start of a year-long stay in an icy research base 8,700 miles from home. In this "empire of ice and isolation," he says, food is essential to morale.
NPR

North Korea Has An Interesting Offer. And Another Threat

The secretive regime denies any involvement with the Sony Pictures hack and says the U.S. must allow it to help find the real culprit. Or else.
NPR

Hollywood Pros Fear A Chilling Effect After Sony Bows To Hackers

Some in the entertainment industry are wondering if they'll have to be careful now about the stories they tell or the jokes they make in the wake of Sony's withdrawal of The Interview.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.