Filed Under:

What's That Sound? The Rhythm That Ruled 2011

There's one sound that pretty much dominated pop music this year. Monster hits by LMFAO, Adele, Katy Perry, Nicki Minaj, Britney Spears and more all relied on the hammering beat known as "four-on-the-floor."

"You feel it in your whole body, just on every beat: boom, boom, boom, boom," says Jordan Roseman. "It's so easy to understand, it's almost hard not to move to it."

Roseman, better known as DJ Earworm, is intimately familiar with these songs and their matching beats. He mixed them all together in his annual mashup of the year's biggest pop hits, a series he calls "The United State of Pop." He says that four-on-the-floor, while not a new sensation, dominated the radio dial in 2011.

"It goes back to disco. Right when these big speakers came along, all of a sudden the kick drum took this new prominence in music because you could really feel it," Roseman says. "It's definitely peaking right now."

You can download Roseman's 2011 mashup, "World Go Boom," at the DJ Earworm website.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

'The Terror Years' Traces The Rise Of Al-Qaida And ISIS

Lawrence Wright's new book collects his essays for The New Yorker on the growth of terrorism in the Middle East, from the 9/11 attacks to the recent beheadings of journalists and aid workers.
NPR

Soda Tax Drives Down Sales In Berkeley, Calif.

According to interviews conducted before and after Berkeley imposed a tax on sugary drinks, the tax is having the desired effect. People reported drinking 20 percent fewer sugar-sweetened drinks after the tax went into effect.
NPR

Mike Pence Got His Hair Cut At A Black Barbershop And This Happened

The GOP vice presidential candidate dropped into a Pennsylvania barbershop to get a haircut Thursday. The barber wasn't quite sure who he was.
WAMU 88.5

Why We Open Our Hearts And Wallets For Some Disasters—But Not Others

Flooding in Louisiana has caused tens of millions of dollars in property damage and untold personal misery. But public response has been slow. Join us to talk about why we open our hearts and wallets for some disasters and not others.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.