Post Your Pictures, Then Take A Walk Through History | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Post Your Pictures, Then Take A Walk Through History

Play associated audio

Imagine standing on a street corner and being able to see what it looked like 20, 50 or even 100 years ago. You could see how it's evolved or, perhaps, stayed the same.

That's what the website Historypin is like — a photographic trip down memory lane of a specific location. It takes modern photos of places and superimposes vintage pictures of the same location over them.

Historypin has already collected 55,000 pictures, videos and audio files since it started last year.

Nick Stanhope is the CEO of the British non-profit behind Historypin, and he tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz the site is a new way to do something people have always done.

"What an amazing idea that we're really most of the time doing the same kinds of things as our ancestors," Stanhope says. "Obviously technology has changed ... but a lot of what's recorded on Historypin is just ordinary people going about their daily business — which is actually very similar through the ages rather than drastically different."

There's also an app for mobile devices, which uses GPS to find content that's been added around your vicinity. "We want people to share history as it happens and as it continues to happen," Stanhope says.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Diversity Sells — But Hollywood Remains Overwhelmingly White, Male

Women and minorities continue to be under-represented on TV and in film, both behind and in front of the camera, according to a new study — even though diverse films and shows make more money.
NPR

Italian Cheese Lovers Find Their Bovine Match Through Adopt A Cow

The cheeses of the Italian Alps are prized for their flavor. But the tradition of cheese-making here is dying off. Now remaining farmers are banding together around an unusual adoption program.
NPR

Is The Battle Won And Done For Those Who Fought For Net Neutrality?

In a 3-2 vote on Feb. 26, the FCC approved new rules, regulating broadband internet as a public utility. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with Mat Honan, San Francisco bureau chief for BuzzFeed News, about the political implications of the vote.
NPR

A Neuroscientist Weighs In: Why Do We Disagree On The Color Of The Dress?

Robert Siegel speaks with Dr. Bevil Conway, a neuroscientist at Wellesley College, about the dress that has the whole Internet asking: What color is it?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.