Filed Under:

Popular Contraceptive In Africa Increases HIV Risk

Play associated audio
The latest in a series of studies lends support to the possibility that the most popular form of birth control in many African countries — an injectable contraception that lasts for three months — is linked to an increased risk of HIV infection. Women using this type of birth control were twice as likely to become infected and nearly twice as likely to pass the virus to their male partners, compared to women not using hormonal contraception. Health experts are dismayed by the possibility, which, if true, is a setback for both family planning and HIV prevention. The World Health Organization is calling experts together to figure out what to do next.
NPR

Peruvians Love Their Chicha Street Art. The Government ... Not So Much

Walk down a street in Peru and you'll likely see an example of the glow-in-the-dark posters and murals. Lots of people love them. But the upper crust — and the government — aren't impressed.
NPR

Tea-Infused Sweets: Chocolate + Jasmine Tea Is A Match Made In Heaven

Smoky and floral brews can provide a kick of flavor to desserts, especially when blended with chocolate. Pastry chef Naomi Gallego shows us a few tricks for surprising the palate with tea.
NPR

Despite Large Cuts To Greece's Pension System, Creditors Want More

NPR's Robert Siegel interviews Matthew Dalton, a reporter for the Wall Street Journal, about how the Greek pension system has been as generous as reported.
WAMU 88.5

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

The president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, chats about the future of higher education — and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.