Hugh Laurie Sings The Blues

Fans of Hugh Laurie on House -- a show for which he's been nominated for six Emmys — know that grumpy Dr. House doesn't get at all of Laurie's talents. He was previously best known for comedy, particularly what he did with Stephen Fry on shows like Jeeves And Wooster. But on House, while he does plenty of dark comedy, he also plays heavy drama.

And now he's released an album of New Orleans and Delta blues. (He knows its' a little counterintuitive. But that's okay.)

He talks about the record, called Let Them Talk, on today's All Things Considered, and there's a lot more detail about it — and you can hear a couple of the songs for yourself — over at NPR Music. But for the time being, I wanted to make sure that those of you who have swooned over him so generously so many times didn't miss it. Once the audio is available, you can hear it right here.

One more thing: The recording of the album will also be the subject of an episode of PBS's Great Performances at the end of September, so we'll talk about it once more at that time.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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