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Fresh Air Weekend: Michael Lewis, Jon Langford, And A Housekeeping How-To

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Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

On A 'Rigged' Wall Street, Milliseconds Make All The Difference: "The stock market is rigged," Michael Lewis says. In his new book Flash Boys, he describes how computerized transactions known as high-frequency trading are creating an uneven playing field.

Jon Langford Sings Our Impulse To Destroy: The Mekons and Waco Brothers veteran often places his left-wing politics front and center in his music and his art. Here Be Monsters has a way of mixing pretty melodies with harsh criticisms.

Embarrassing Stains? This Housekeeping Guide Gets That Life Is Messy: Jerry Seinfeld joked that if you have bloodstains on your clothes, you have bigger problems than the laundry. But Jolie Kerr helps with all the stains in a new book, My Boyfriend Barfed in My Handbag.

You can listen to the original interviews here:

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