WAMU 88.5 : Metro Connection

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This Week On Metro Connection: Crack, The Drug That Consumed D.C.

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Washington, D.C. is in the midst of major change — its population is growing, new high-rise buildings can be seen across the city, and the homicide rate is at historic lows. But 25 years ago, dealers sold crack at hundreds of open-air drug markets, addiction swept across entire neighborhoods, and the city came to be known as the "Nation's Murder Capital." In this five-part series, WAMU 88.5 explores the legacy of that era and how D.C. continues to grapple with an epidemic that affected families, neighborhoods, politicians, policemen, and schools.

Crack’s Rapid Rise Brought Chaos To The District

For years, powdered cocaine was D.C.'s drug of choice, but when crack hit the streets, the city was afflicted by levels of addiction and violence that caught residents, police and politicians by surprise. Read more »

D.C. Crack Users Were In the Streets – And City Hall

As D.C.'s police and politicians responded to the crack epidemic, the man charged with leading the fight — Mayor Marion Barry — became a user himself. Read more »

Crack-Addicted Mothers Gave Up Everything – Even Kids

Crack's allure was so powerful that families were torn apart and mothers were driven to abandon their children. Read More »

D.C. Residents Caught Amid Crack’s Turf Wars

As the crack epidemic spread, residents of neighborhoods like Shaw found themselves in the middle of bloody turf battles — many waged by young men who felt they had nothing to lose. Read More »

Churches And Civic Groups Joined The Fight Against Crack

When crack-related violence engulfed D.C. neighborhoods, churches and civic groups didn't take cover — they led the charge in the fight against addiction and death. Read more »

Full Interview: NPR's Michele Norris On Dooney Waters

In 1989, Michele Norris wrote about Dooney Waters, a six-year-old whose mother was a crack addict. His story became an emblem of the impact the crack epidemic had on families. Read more »

Video: The Making Of 'Crack: The Drug That Consumed D.C.'

In this video we hear from the reporters who worked on "Crack: The Drug That Consumed The Nation's Capital," WAMU 88.5's five-part series on the crack epidemic that swept D.C. in the 1980s and 90s. Watch it »

Timeline: The Crack Epidemic In D.C.

WAMU 88.5

Anne Tyler: "A Spool Of Blue Thread" (Rebroadcast)

In her first live radio interview ever, Pulitzer Prize winning author Anne Tyler joins Diane to talk about her 20th novel, "A Spool of Blue Thread."


Thanksgiving Buzz: What Would Pilgrims Say About The Plight Of Bees?

When you sit down for your holiday dinner, you may want to give thanks to bees and other pollinators. Their health is tied to your food. What's behind the bee declines? Watch our video investigation.

Capitol Hill Lawmakers Find Living At The Office Makes Sense, Saves Cents

Three office buildings on the House side of the U.S. Capitol serve as offices, and by night as lawmakers' apartments. Dozens of lawmakers choose to sleep in the office when Congress is in session.

From Takeout To Breakups: Apps Can Deliver Anything, For A Price

Convenience is at an all-time premium — and a lot of smartphone apps promise to make many of the things we do every day easier. In a time-crunch or sheer laziness, how far will the apps take us?

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