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Art Beat With Lauren Landau, May 23

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Amy Hanaiali'i Gilliom is one of Hawaii's most respected female vocalists. She'll be performing a free concert at the National Museum of the American Indian this Saturday at 5 p.m.
Photo courtesy of Amy Hanaiali'i Gilliom
Amy Hanaiali'i Gilliom is one of Hawaii's most respected female vocalists. She'll be performing a free concert at the National Museum of the American Indian this Saturday at 5 p.m.

May 25-26: Celebrate Hawaii Festival 
May is Asian Pacific Heritage Month, and even though the month is winding down, it's not too late to celebrate. This weekend you can enjoy all things Hawaii at a number of free programs at the National Museum of the American Indian. From 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday you can take part in the annual Celebrate Hawaii Festival, which will include film screenings, hula performances, family-friendly activities, and more. This Saturday you can head to the museum's Outdoor Welcome Plaza at 5 p.m. for a free concert by The Aloha Boys and Grammy-nominated singer Amy Hanaiali`i Gilliom.

May 23-Jun. 22: A Cloud is Not a Sphere 
CulturalDC presents A Cloud is Not a Sphere at Flashpoint Gallery through June 22. The solo exhibit by visual artist Victoria Fu is a mixture of photographs and film projections that come together in a colorful installation blending still and moving images. 

Music: "Better Together (Instrumental)" by Jack Johnson 

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