Art Beat With Jacob Fenston, Nov. 20 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Art Beat With Jacob Fenston, Nov. 20

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The Jogja Hip Hop Foundation crew.
Jogja Hip Hop Foundation
The Jogja Hip Hop Foundation crew.

Nov. 20 - Dropping Beats On Java
In the mood for some Indonesian hip-hop? Well you might be when you hear the members of the Jogja Hip-Hop Foundation. They're performing a free show this evening at the Kennedy Center's Millennium Stage. Where else can you hear 18th century Javanese poetry with a hip-hop beat? The group mixes traditional and contemporary sounds, and takes on social issues like corruption and inequality. Worth a listen, even if you don't understand the words. The show starts at 6 p.m.

Nov. 20 - The Real Thomas Jefferson
Not feeling the 18th century Javanese literature? How about 18th century Virginia? Historian Henry Wiencek is sure to spark a lively debate tonight, discussing his controversial book about founding father Thomas Jefferson. The new book, Master of the Mountain, reassesses Jefferson and finds him to be a ruthless businessman, slave-owner, racist, and hypocrite. The event at Politics and Prose begins at 7 p.m.

Music: "Ki Jarot Feat. Soimah Pancawati, A Poetry of Radja Ali Haji - Gurindam 12"

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