WAMU 88.5 : Art Beat

Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, May 15

Play associated audio
The Washington National Opera takes on Verdi's biblical Nabucco.
The Kennedy Center
The Washington National Opera takes on Verdi's biblical Nabucco.

(May 17-20) Women of the Blues
Some of the best voices in blues were those of women and several of them are remembered this week with Creative Cauldron’s Women of the Blues, showing at ArtSpace Falls Church. The musical features a powerhouse quartet of local female vocalists channeling a few of the form’s most soulful and sassy.

(May 15) Hunger Angel
One of the most acclaimed voices in contemporary literature speaks tonight at the Library of Congress. Nobel Laureate Herta Müller reads from and discusses her latest book, The Hunger Angel, which depicts the physical and moral absurdity of a Gulag.

(May 15-21) Verdi’s landmark libretto
The Kennedy Center presents the libretto that put Giuseppe Verdi on the map through next Monday. The Washington National Opera’s Nabucco tells of the epic struggle of one royal family at odds with their nation and each other. The powerful work traces the defeat, enslavement, and exile of the ancient Babylonian Jews.

Music: “Family” by Bill Frisell

NPR

Not My Job: We Quiz Lena Headey On Games Worse Than 'Game Of Thrones'

Game of Thrones may have killed off many major characters, but the manipulative, scheming Queen Cersei is still standing. We've invited Headey to play a game called "You win and you die."
NPR

After Introducing Changes, Keurig Sales Continue To Fall

Despite America's high coffee consumption, Keurig reported disappointing sales this week. Even during its popular holiday selling period, the numbers haven't perked up in recent years.
NPR

Do Political TV Ads Still Work?

TV ads are a tried-and-true way for politicians to get their message out. But in this chaotic presidential primary, are they still effective?
NPR

Twitter Says It Has Shut Down 125,000 Terrorism-Related Accounts

The announcement comes just weeks after a woman sued Twitter, saying the platform knowingly let ISIS use the network "to spread propaganda, raise money and attract recruits."

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.