Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, May 15 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Art Beat With Sean Rameswaram, May 15

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The Washington National Opera takes on Verdi's biblical Nabucco.
The Kennedy Center
The Washington National Opera takes on Verdi's biblical Nabucco.

(May 17-20) Women of the Blues
Some of the best voices in blues were those of women and several of them are remembered this week with Creative Cauldron’s Women of the Blues, showing at ArtSpace Falls Church. The musical features a powerhouse quartet of local female vocalists channeling a few of the form’s most soulful and sassy.

(May 15) Hunger Angel
One of the most acclaimed voices in contemporary literature speaks tonight at the Library of Congress. Nobel Laureate Herta Müller reads from and discusses her latest book, The Hunger Angel, which depicts the physical and moral absurdity of a Gulag.

(May 15-21) Verdi’s landmark libretto
The Kennedy Center presents the libretto that put Giuseppe Verdi on the map through next Monday. The Washington National Opera’s Nabucco tells of the epic struggle of one royal family at odds with their nation and each other. The powerful work traces the defeat, enslavement, and exile of the ancient Babylonian Jews.

Music: “Family” by Bill Frisell

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In This Test Kitchen, The Secret To A Great Cookbook Is Try, Try Again

Yotam Ottolenghi and his partner have a thriving food empire that includes wildly successful cookbooks. We go inside their London test kitchen as recipes are put through their paces.
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Bugs: Not What's For Dinner — Until They're Tastier, Maybe

A U.K. researcher says the environmental argument for eating bugs isn't working on its own. She says chefs and policymakers must "make insect dishes appeal as food, not just a way to save the planet."
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Fact Check: 3 Questions Answered About Bill Clinton's LLC

Does Bill Clinton have a secret corporation that he is using to hide money? Is it intended to pay a lower tax rate? Or is it something else entirely?
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Questions Remain About How To Use Data From License Plate Scanners

The scanners are standard equipment for police, but what's not settled is what happens to all the data collected. That data can link people to certain addresses and flag unusual activity.

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