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WAMU News Team Remembers 9/11

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The events of 9/11 forever changed the way the the WAMU news team viewed their jobs.
Nathasha Lim
The events of 9/11 forever changed the way the the WAMU news team viewed their jobs.

This week, as we approach the tenth anniversary of 9/11, we're examining how the terrorist attacks changed the National Capital Region and the world. The events of that day affected many institutions--- including the news media. It changed the way broadcasters, including those at WAMU, prepare for and cover breaking news, as they explain in their own words.

Bill Redlin, former WAMU Morning Edition host/anchor, now WAMU mid-day host/anchor: "It certainly made me aware the things that you couldn't even imagine are possible, and you have to deal with that."

Mark McDonald, WAMU Program Director: "There was a heightened sense of the importance of knowing how to get somewhere quickly and how important it was for the public to have appropriate information."

James Jones, former WAMU acting News Director/reporter: "There were so many rumors going around. There was another plane coming in. There was a bombing at the State Department. All you could actually do was go to the spot where the rumor was."

Lakshmi Singh, former WAMU reporter, currently an NPR newscaster: "There were so many stories about people. We couldn't just talk about the economy or the infrastructure. We had to make sure that we humanized it."

Kathy Merritt, former WAMU Station Manager, now Senior Director for Program Investments for Radio Dept. at CPB: "That to me was the toughest part of the day. We had to send our reporters into the unknown."

Listen to the full version of them describing 9/11 in their own words.

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