Global Perspective: Escape from Honduras | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Global Perspective: Escape from Honduras

Wed., April 13 at 9 p.m. on WAMU 88.5 and 88.3 Ocean City; Thurs., April 14 at 12 p.m. on Intersection 88.5-3

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From the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the series theme "Who Says I Can't" takes on a double meaning.  There's the defiance of Eduardo Lopez, and the price it exacts.  And then there's the story of those in authority...those who say, you can't.

The story begins in the Central American country of Honduras and ends in Canada.  Canada's self-image as a safe haven for refugees is part of the national myth...except that there is always a gatekeeper - a bureaucrat in an immigration office who says you can or you can't come in.  And that's where broadcaster Natasha Fatah begins her documentary, Escape from Honduras.

Escape from Honduras was presented by Natasha Fatah and produced by Natasha Fatah and Mark Ulster.

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