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Police Raid Two D.C. Head Shops

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Capitol Hemp locations in Chinatown and Adams Morgan were raided by police at 7 p.m. Wednesday, who confiscated $300,000 in inventory.
Capitol Hemp
Capitol Hemp locations in Chinatown and Adams Morgan were raided by police at 7 p.m. Wednesday, who confiscated $300,000 in inventory.

Seven people were arrested during a police raid at a pair of head shops in D.C. Police say six employees and one customer of the Capitol Hemp stores were arrested for drug paraphernalia. Three of the employees were also charged with drug possession with intent to distribute, though charges against one employee have been dropped.

Store owner Adam Eidinger says the raids happened during store hours on Wednesday.

Eidinger, who is a well-known local activist, has been a strong advocate for medical marijuana. He says the raids were unjust and politically motivated. Eidinger recently called for an Occupy Adams Morgan movement in response to plans to build a luxury hotel in Adams Morgan.

He says no drugs were found at the store, and says police confiscated $300,000 worth of inventory, including computers, cash registers, and tobacco waterpipes and vaporizers.

Capitol Hemp stores will re-open Friday. 

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