WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Police Raid Two D.C. Head Shops

Play associated audio
Capitol Hemp locations in Chinatown and Adams Morgan were raided by police at 7 p.m. Wednesday, who confiscated $300,000 in inventory.
Capitol Hemp
Capitol Hemp locations in Chinatown and Adams Morgan were raided by police at 7 p.m. Wednesday, who confiscated $300,000 in inventory.

Seven people were arrested during a police raid at a pair of head shops in D.C. Police say six employees and one customer of the Capitol Hemp stores were arrested for drug paraphernalia. Three of the employees were also charged with drug possession with intent to distribute, though charges against one employee have been dropped.

Store owner Adam Eidinger says the raids happened during store hours on Wednesday.

Eidinger, who is a well-known local activist, has been a strong advocate for medical marijuana. He says the raids were unjust and politically motivated. Eidinger recently called for an Occupy Adams Morgan movement in response to plans to build a luxury hotel in Adams Morgan.

He says no drugs were found at the store, and says police confiscated $300,000 worth of inventory, including computers, cash registers, and tobacco waterpipes and vaporizers.

Capitol Hemp stores will re-open Friday. 

WAMU 88.5

Introducing Capital Soundtrack, A New WAMU Music Project

What does Washington sound like? Capital Soundtrack, a new music project from WAMU 88.5, explores that question.
NPR

Evaporated Cane Juice? Puh-leeze. Just Call It Sugar, FDA Says

Companies cultivating a healthful image often list "evaporated cane juice" in their products' ingredients. But the FDA says it's really just sugar, and that's what food labels should call it.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour - May 27, 2016

Congress votes to override DC's 2013 ballot initiative on budget autonomy. Virginia governor faces a federal investigation over international finance and lobbying rules. And DC, Maryland and Virginia move to create a Metro safety oversight panel.

NPR

After Departure Of Uber, Lyft In Austin, New Companies Enter The Void

Earlier this month, voters in Austin, Texas, rejected an effort to overturn the city's rules for ride-hailing companies. Uber and Lyft tried to prevent fingerprinting of their drivers, and now both have left town. A few other ride-share companies have popped up to help fill the void. NPR explores how people are getting around town without Uber and Lyft.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.