Metro GM Blames Recent Mechanical Problems On Cold Weather | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Metro GM Blames Recent Mechanical Problems On Cold Weather

Play associated audio
The Yellow Line was the only one operating without problems on Wednesday morning.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/luisrubio/198929751/
The Yellow Line was the only one operating without problems on Wednesday morning.

Metro's top executive says cold weather is mostly to blame for another morning of mechanical problems that snarled trains on four of Metro's five rail lines.

Disabled trains led to long delays in the heart of rush hour on all lines but the Yellow Line. One morning last week, all five lines had problems, and Metro General Manager Richard Sarles even got stuck waiting on a freezing outdoor platform. Appearing today on WAMU's The Kojo Namdi Show, Sarles said the cold is the problem.

"The Metro is not immune to the weather, especially very frigid days like today," Sarles said. "Today and some of the other deep freeze days we've had, we've had troubles with the rolling stock of equipment."

There are problems, though, that commuters are all too familiar with: old equipment — especially rail cars — that is slowly being replaced and a multi-year reconstruction effort that has three more years to go. It will take five years to roll out the first compliment of new 7000 series rail cars.

"Well, I don't like to ask people to be patient. They deserve to have a system that works everyday," Sarles said. "We have made a lot of improvements over the last three, four years."

The metrics Metro uses to measure on-time performance for bus and rail service or the service of its escalators and elevators do show improvement, but for commuters stuck just about every morning in another rush hour-delay, those metrics don't mean much, especially with Metro preparing to raise fares again this year.

NPR

'Little House,' Big Demand: Never Underestimate Laura Ingalls Wilder

Wilder's memoir reveals that she witnessed more violence than you'd ever know from her children's books. The South Dakota State Historical Society can barely keep up with demand for the autobiography.
NPR

Coffee Horror: Parody Pokes At Environmental Absurdity Of K-Cups

The market for single-serving coffee pods is dominated by Keurig's K-Cups. But they aren't recyclable, and critics say that's making a monster of an environmental mess. Meet the K-Cup Godzilla.
NPR

The Next Air Force One Will Be A Boeing 747-8

The Air Force says the decision came down to the American-made 747-8 or the Airbus A380, which is manufactured in France. But even with that pick, the 747 program might not last much longer.
NPR

Charles Townes, Laser Inventor, Black Hole Discoverer, Dies At 99

Physicist Charles Townes died Tuesday. He was a key inventor of the laser and won the Nobel Prize for his discovery in 1964. But his career didn't end there.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.