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Young, Religious D.C. Area Residents Cross Faith Lines For Service

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Young people of about a dozen different faiths in the D.C. region are uniting to preform community service.

They came together last weekend to focus on points where their missions overlap. Jack Gordon of Faith in Action D.C. says this generation is eager to cross traditional boundaries.

"The dialogue that we have as millennials is a very different type of inter-faith dialogue than our parents and grandparents," Gordon says. "And so it's appropriate that we would come together as emerging leaders in our respective faith communities and talk about what it is that we find as successes and challenges in our particular faith communities."

It was an eye opening dialogue, he adds.

"People got a chance to see the work that they're doing is parallel to other faith communities, often times within the exact same neighborhood," he says.

D.C. resident Gretchen Rydin says she's expecting this weekend's meeting to bear lasting fruit.

"So it's really sharing ideas and partnering down the road," she says. "I already talked to several who we've got some service projects planned maybe in the next couple months or other social events where we want to mingle our cultures and our faiths."

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