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CM Graham Violated Code Of Conduct, Ethics Board Finds

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Council member Jim Graham, who has been accused of ethics violations for a deal with a developer in 2008.
Mallory Noe-Payne
Council member Jim Graham, who has been accused of ethics violations for a deal with a developer in 2008.

The District of Columbia's ethics board has found evidence that D.C. Council member Jim Graham violated the city's code of conduct for elected officials when he intervened in the lottery contracting process. But the board is not pursuing the matter because it has no authority to punish him. 

The board was investigating whether Graham improperly offered to support a developer's bid for the lottery contract in 2008 in exchange for the developer's withdrawal from a project at a Metro station. It found that he lost impartiality and gave preferential treatment to another developer that had contributed to his campaign. 

But the board says it can't sanction Graham because his actions occurred before the board was created. A federal grand jury is also investigating the lottery contracting process, including Graham's involvement. 

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